Intermediate Phase
SOCIAL SCIENCES
  General comment:

In the Intermediate Phase, Languages and Mathematics are distinct Learning Programmes. Learning Programmes must ensure that the prescribed outcomes for each Learning area are covered effectively and comprehensively. Schools may decide on the number and nature of other Learning Programmes based on the organisational imperatives of the school, provided that the national priorities and developmental needs of Learners in a phase are taken into account.
 
  Social Sciences:

Definition

The Social Sciences Learning Area studies relationships between people, and between people and the environment. These relationships vary over time and space. They are also influenced by social, political, economic and environmental contexts, and by people’s values, attitudes and beliefs.

The concepts, skills and processes of History and Geography form key elements of the Social Sciences Learning Area in the school curriculum. Environmental education and human rights education are integral to this Learning Area.

The Social Sciences Learning Area is concerned both with what learners learn and how they learn and construct knowledge. Learners are encouraged to ask questions and find answers about society and the environment in which they live.

This Learning Area contributes to the development of informed, critical and responsible citizens who are able to participate constructively in a culturally diverse and changing society. It also equips learners to contribute to the development of a just and democratic society.

HISTORY
Learners in the Intermediate Phase can place events, people and changes within a chronological framework by using timerelated terms such as ‘BCE’ and ‘century’. By selecting and accessing various types of sources that provide information about the past, learners can record, organise and categorise information. They begin to distinguish between opinions, facts and information. Not only do they give reasons for events, but they can also explain the results of an event (for example, how the event has affected people’s lives).

Learners begin to explore similarities and differences between the ways of life in different places, and why some aspects of society have changed over time and other aspects have not. They begin to recognise different viewpoints about the past and compare versions of the past. Learners begin to contribute actively to the establishment of a school and community archive and oral history project.

Learning Outcome 1 has been designed to facilitate natural integration and links between History and Geography within the Social Sciences Learning Area. Natural links also occur between some of the Assessment Standards of the other Learning Outcomes as well as in the content areas.

GEOGRAPHY
Learners in the Intermediate Phase are encouraged to ask key questions about the environment and resources and to seek suitable answers, propose solutions and make appropriate decisions. Learners should be able to write simple descriptions, present comparisons, express views and put forward personal opinions about the relationship between the environment and human activity. Fieldwork forms an important learning opportunity in this phase; learners are encouraged to ‘see things with their own eyes’ and to observe and record information. Learners are also expected to sort, list, describe, compare and match information through the use of simple graphs, maps and pictures through which they communicate their understanding and knowledge of the environment, resources and social issues. Furthermore, learners are encouraged to participate in ways that will contribute toward a sustainable social and biophysical environment.

Learning Outcome 1 has been designed to facilitate natural integration and links between History and Geography within the Social Sciences Learning Area. Natural links also occur between some of the Assessment Standards of the other Learning Outcomes as well as in the knowledge focus areas.
 
HISTORY
Learning Outcome 1: HISTORICAL ENQUIRY
The learner will be able to use enquiry skills to investigate the past and present.
Assessment Standards: (Some examples)

Grade 4

We know this when the learner records and organises information from a variety of sources (e.g. oral, written and visual sources, including maps, graphs and tables, objects, buildings, monuments, museums) [works with sources].

Grade 5

We know this when the learner with guidance, selects sources useful for finding information on the past (e.g. oral, written and visual sources, including maps, graphs and tables, objects, buildings, monuments, museums) [finds sources].

Grade 6

We know this when the learner identifies sources to help answer the question about the topic (e.g. oral, written and visual sources, including maps, graphs and tables, objects, buildings, monuments, museums) [finds sources].
Learning Outcome 2: HISTORICAL KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
The learner will be able to demonstrate historical knowledge and understanding.
Assessment Standards: (some examples)

Grade 4

We know this when the learner uses common words and phrases relating to the passing of time (e.g. old, new, before, after, months, years) [chronology and time].

Grade 5

We know this when the learner uses dates and terms relating to the passing of time (e.g. decade, century), and arranges them in order [chronology and time].

Grade 6

We know this when the learner places events, people and changes on a timeline which includes terms such as ‘BC’, ‘AD’ and ‘BCE’ [chronology and time].
Learning Outcome 3: HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION
The learner will be able to interpret aspects of history.
Assessment Standards: (some examples)

Grade 4

We know this when the learner recognises that there can be two points of view about the same event in the past [source interpretation].

Grade 5

We know this when the learner recognises that there can be more than one version of an historical event (e.g. that there can be two accounts of the same story) [source interpretation].

Grade 6

We know this when the learner compares two versions of an historical event using visual or written sources [source interpretation].


GEOGRAPHY
Learning Outcome 1: GEOGRAPHICAL ENQUIRY
The learner will be able to use enquiry skills to investigate geographical and environmental concepts and processes.
Assessment Standards: (Some examples)

Grade 4

We know this when the learner identifies information from various sources (maps, atlases, books) [finds sources].

Grade 5

We know this when the learner with guidance, selects and uses sources of useful geographical information (including graphs, maps and fieldwork outside the classroom) [finds sources].

Grade 6

We know this when the learner identifies sources of information, including simple statistics, to help answer the question about a social or environmental issue or problem [finds sources].
Learning Outcome 2: GEOGRAPHICAL KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING
The learner will be able to demonstrate geographical and environmental knowledge and understanding.
Assessment Standards: (some examples)

Grade 4

We know this when the learner describes the features of the local settlement, including land uses, and compares them with examples from other places [people and places].

Grade 5

We know this when the learner identifies and describes major physical features of South Africa, including those of the home province [people and places].

Grade 6

We know this when the learner explains why more people live in some places than others [people and places].
Learning Outcome 3: EXPLORING ISSUES
The learner will be able to make informed decisions about social and environmental issues and problems.
Assessment Standards: (some examples)

Grade 4

We know this when the learner identifies issues associated with resources and services in a particular context [identify the issue].

Grade 5

We know this when the learner identifies challenges to societies and settlements, with a focus on the spread of diseases [identifies the issue].

Grade 6

We know this when the learner identifies inequalities within and between societies [identifies the issue].
To view the complete Social Sciences Curriculum document, click here